MILOS RAONIC

 Canada

Height

6’5”

Plays

Right-handed, two-handed backhand

Singles titles:

8

Doubles titles:

Highest ATP Singles ranking:

3

Career prize money

$17,938,328

milos_cutout

TIE BREAK RECORD

Career Tie Break Win/Loss:

228-158

Career Percentage Tie Breaks Won:

59%

MEET MILOS RAONIC

Tie Break Tennis welcomes back the big serving Canadian superstar, Milos Raonic, who is one of the most feared players on tour due to his attacking style. Some consider Raonic’s serve to be amongst the best of all time and with stats such as winning 91% of service games he ranks as third on the all-time list.
Raonic prefers playing on hard-courts but made the Wimbledon final in 2016 beating Roger Federer along the way before losing to Andy Murray in the final.
Currently ranked 14 in the world, Milos is coached by another big server and ex-TB10 star, Goran Ivanisevic. He had a great run in Australia reaching the quarter finals, losing to Lucas Pouille in a tight four-setter. Reaching a career high of no 3 in 2011, Raonic is the highest ranked Canadian player in history.

‘Having competed in Melbourne last year I’m looking forward to giving Tie Break Tens a go again and going further in the tournament. Its such a great night and its fun to hang out with other players on the court and seeing the action so close.’

TIE BREAK STRENGTHS

EXPLOSIVE

Aided by his serve, he plays an all-court style with an emphasis on short points. Raonic currently tops the ace count in the men’s game with 132 aces during the Australian Open. He has hit nearly 7,000 aces so far in his career.

EXPERIENCE

Having played TB10 Melbourne in 2018 Milos knows what it takes to compete in a tie-break, using his fearsome serve to his advantage and dominating points early on. With his size and stature Raonic is a formidable figure to face at the opposite side of the net.

AGGRESSION

Raonic has great groundstrokes but his forehand is stronger than his backhand and because of this he has been known to run around his backhand and play inside out forehands instead. He attempts to dictate play and is generally more aggressive than his opponent as evidenced by usually having more winners and more unforced errors.

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